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Annotate And Chart A Few Texts 1

I attached the chart at the bottom on a separate doc

Synthesis Module: The Value of Life

Charting Multiple Texts

Overview

As you look down the side of the chart, you will see that it asks you for information about the different texts you will be reading in this assignment: 

  • Title, Author, Genre – The title and author are self-explanatory. “Genre” means “type,” so you are asked to describe the type of writing. For this first text, you would put “Drama” or “Play” as the genre. 

Across the top of the chart are the ideas you will be tracking as you read the texts in this module. They are presented in the form of questions: 

  • What is the text’s big issue? Here you will identify the “main idea” of the text. 
  • What claim does the text make? This asks you to identify the writer’s perspective on the main idea. 
  • What are examples or quotes from the text? This is where you would put examples given by the writer to help the reader understand his or her claim. The quotes and paraphrases you worked on earlier will fit well here. Be sure to include page or line numbers (or both) to identify where you found the quotation or idea. 
  • What do you think about the text’s claim? In this box, you will explain your response to the text’s claim, including to what extent (if any) you agree with it. 
  • What are your examples? In this column, give a few examples from your own experiences that help explain your response to the text’s claim.

How does this text connect to other texts? If you see a similarity to another text, make note of it here. Connections can be made even among texts that have very different claims. Take a few moments to fill in the chart for Hamlet’s soliloquy. The final box on making connections may

annotate each article attached below

Text 1: Hamlet’s soliloquy

Background

At this point in the play, Hamlet feels that he is in a crisis. His father died a few months earlier under mysterious circumstances. Hamlet discovers that his father was secretly murdered—by Hamlet’s uncle, Claudius. Making things even worse, Claudius then marries Hamlet’s mother. Hamlet does not know what to do about this knowledge. He wonders whether he can trust anyone or if perhaps he is going crazy. As you first read the text, focus on what you see as the “big picture” Hamlet describes.

1. Annotations

Because this series of texts focuses on the way people value life, you will need to take note of main ideas and the writing techniques used to communicate the claims. Your task is to annotate the text, marking the specific information indicated below. You are encouraged to make your own copy of the Module Texts and use Kami to complete your annotations. This will allow you to have a single document with all of your notes. You will be able to resubmit the single document for each subsequent annotation assignment.

For the task to be considered complete, you will need to identify through marking the required elements in the text and provide commentary for your annotations.

Annotate for the following:

  1. Where does Hamlet ask the central question of his soliloquy?
  2. Where does he restate this question in greater detail?
  3. Does Hamlet ever answer this question?
  4. What other questions does Hamlet ask in this speech?
  5. Mark the places in the text where Hamlet describes what it means to be alive.
    • Example: In lines 2-3, Hamlet describes life as “the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,” so you could highlight that phrase as an example of what Hamlet thinks it means “to be.”
  6. Mark the examples with a “+” or “–” to indicate whether the examples show a positive (+) outlook on life or a negative (–) one.
    • For the example above (“the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune”), you would mark a “–” because it compares being alive to being under attack.
  7. Identify three figures of speech Hamlet uses to express himself AND paraphrase these figures of speech..
    • Three could include metaphors or personification. For instance, when Hamlet calls whatever happens after death “the undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns,” he’s metaphorically comparing the mysteries of the afterlife to dangerous, unchartered lands—something explorers from Shakespeare’s time period were deeply interested in.
    • “Paraphrasing” means putting the ideas of another writer into your own words. Again using the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” metaphor, a paraphrase might sound something like this: “Hamlet compares being alive to having fate shoot arrows at him.” As you paraphrase, pay attention to the style used by Shakespeare to convey his ideas.
  8. Identify and comment on the effects of Shakespeare’s stylistic choices as a writer.
    • For example, what is the difference between having Hamlet say that life is like “the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” and having him just say, “Life isn’t very pleasant?”
  9. Mark where Hamlet’s soliloquy uses emotion (pathos) and logic (logos) to create specific effects on the reader.

2. Summarizing – add your summary to the text in the blank space under the final line. Be sure to include the following content in your summary:

  • What is the big issue in Hamlet’s soliloquy?
  • What claim or argument about the value of life does Hamlet make?
  • What do you think about Hamlet’s claim?

—————————————————————————————-To be completed in next class

3. Charting* (will be scored after all readings have been completed)

Take a look at the chart constructed for this assignment. It is a graphic organizer to help you keep track of various pieces of information and the relationships among those pieces. You are welcome to make a copy of the version I’ve made for you or create your own organizational tool. The chart will prove especially useful in the final synthesis assessment you will complete at the end of this module.

Overview

As you look down the side of the chart, you will see that it asks you for information about the different texts you will be reading in this assignment:

  • Title, Author, Genre – The title and author are self-explanatory. “Genre” means “type,” so you are asked to describe the type of writing. For this first text, you would put “Drama” or “Play” as the genre.

Across the top of the chart are the ideas you will be tracking as you read the texts in this module. They are presented in the form of questions:

  • What is the text’s big issue? Here you will identify the “main idea” of the text.
  • What claim does the text make? This asks you to identify the writer’s perspective on the main idea.
  • What are examples or quotes from the text? This is where you would put examples given by the writer to help the reader understand his or her claim. The quotes and paraphrases you worked on earlier will fit well here. Be sure to include page or line numbers (or both) to identify where you found the quotation or idea.
  • What do you think about the text’s claim? In this box, you will explain your response to the text’s claim, including to what extent (if any) you agree with it.
  • What are your examples? In this column, give a few examples from your own experiences that help explain your response to the text’s claim.

How does this text connect to other texts? If you see a similarity to another text, make note of it here. Connections can be made even among texts that have very different claims. Take a few moments to fill in the chart for Hamlet’s soliloquy. The f inal box on making connections may be left blank for the moment.

Text 2: excerpt from “Roger Ebert: The Essential Man”

Background

The second text is an excerpt from an interview with famous film critic Roger Ebert after he lost his lower jawbone and the ability to speak, eat, and drink as a result of his battle with cancer. The article, written by Chris Jones for Esquire, describes the joy and suffering Ebert experienced in his post surgery life. Roger Ebert died on April 4, 2013 at the age of 70.

Full text available here: https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a6945/roger-…

1. Annotations

Because this series of texts focuses on the way people value life, you will need to take note of main ideas and the writing techniques used to communicate the claims. Your task is to annotate the text, marking the specific information indicated below. You are encouraged to make your own copy of the Module Texts and use Kami to complete your annotations. This will allow you to have a single document with all of your notes. You will be able to resubmit the single document for each subsequent annotation assignment.

For the task to be considered complete, you will need to identify through marking the required elements in the text and provide commentary for your annotations.

Annotate for the following:

  1. First, break down the structure of the text. Draw a line across the page where the introduction seems to end AND draw a line across the page where the conclusion begins. Also, note the words and/or phrases that help you identify the transition between sections.
  2. Explain the purpose of the opening, middle, and ending sections of the article.
  3. How does Chris Jones characterize Roger Ebert? In other words, mark the descriptive details, diction, examples, and other information Jones uses to show what kind of person Roger Ebert is.
  4. Identify throughout the text what Ebert values in life. These could include beliefs, perspectives, actions, behaviors, objects, etc.
  5. Highlight the sentences, phrases, or words Ebert uses to describe what he thinks it means to be alive. Remember that most of Ebert’s direct quotations will be in italics.
  6. Mark the descriptions and quotes you’ve identified with a “+” or “–” to indicate whether they show a generally positive or negative outlook on life.
  7. Imagine that you are reading Ebert’s statements from Hamlet’s perspective. Highlight and comment on any passages that Hamlet would find particularly interesting or compelling. Some of these may be the same words you have already highlighted while others will be new.
  8. Identify content in the text that where Ebert’s attitude about death and life compares or contrasts to Hamlet’s attitudes about life and death. How does Ebert’s attitude toward death relate to the way he approaches life?
  9. Mark where Chris Jones’s uses credibility (ethos), emotion (pathos), and logic (logos) to create specific effects on the reader.

2. Summarizing – add your summary to the text in the blank space under the final line. For this summary, you will conduct a brief mock interview. Imagine Hamlet asks Ebert the following questions. You will respond as if you were Roger Ebert.

  • How do you feel you’ve been treated by other people?
  • Are you afraid of death?
  • Are there any benefits to suffering?
  • How do you approach challenges?

3. Charting* (will be scored after all readings have been completed)

Make an entry in your chart for the Ebert text. Fill it out as you did with the soliloquy. When you reach the entry for “How does this text connect to other texts?,” briefly describe the ways in which Ebert responds to or challenges the assertions Shakespeare makes in his soliloquy for Hamlet.

Text 3: “What is a Life Worth?”

Background

The third text comes from the February 12, 2002, issue of Time magazine. In her article, Amanda Ripley describes the U.S. government’s federal Victim Compensation Fund as it was used to compensate families of the victims who died in the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. As you read “What Is a Life Worth?” for the first time, look for the main issues and the various stances people take in response to those issues. Be sure to also look for connections to the idea of valuing life and to what was previously said about valuing life by Shakespeare and Ebert.

Full text available here:

https://bit.ly/3r8oecM – Google Doc

http://content.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599… – Website

1. Analysis

  1. What is the purpose and effect of the subtitle for this article?
  2. How is “life” defined in this text? For example, does “life” refer to a human body, a soul, human experience, existence, or quality of life? Does this definition include a person’s personal life and professional or working life?
  3. Create a T-Chart with two columns. In the first column include the words, phrases, and sentences from the article that describe valuing life in legal and financial terms. In the second column, include the words, phrases, and sentences that describe valuing life in human and emotional terms.
  4. Copy content from the article that shows a generally positive or negative outlook on life. Organize and/or mark with a “+” or “–” the quotes, descriptions, and material accordingly.
  5. Most news articles such as “What Is a Life Worth?” try to take an objective, unbiased approach. Would you agree that this text is unbiased, or do you think it favors one perspective? Explain your answer.
  6. Does the article use logos, pathos, or both to make an impact on the reader? If so, describe how. Compare that use to the way logic and emotion are used by Shakespeare, Ebert, or both.

2. Summarizing – Write a summary of the article’s descriptions of how life is valued AND people’s responses to that valuing of life.

3. Charting* (will be scored after all readings have been completed)

Make a third entry on your chart for “What Is a Life Worth?” Feel free to use the analysis, summary, connections, and critical thinking work you did as a way to fill out the chart.

Text 4-5 Analysis, Summary, and Charting

Text 4: “A Human Life Value Calculator”

Background

The Human Life Value Calculator comes from an Internet resource that calculates the value of a person’s future earnings. The text included in the packet provides an overview of the aspect included in the calculation determining how much life insurance a person should consider purchasing to benefit their spouse and/or dependents. Access a web-based calculator, such as the one HERE, to use the tool with your future plans in mind.

Genre

This text is quite different from the previous three texts. It is not personal or narrative, as the first two texts were, nor is it an informative text designed for a general audience. Instead, as you probably noticed when surveying the text, it is an interactive site, asking the reader to provide data to input and generating specific information based on the particular data provided by the user.

1. Summarizing and Responding

  1. Describe what the text asserts about a human life’s value.
  2. Did this text produce in you an emotional response of any sort? If so, briefly describe it.
  3. To what extent do you agree with the text’s assertions about the valuing of a human’s life? Describe your logical (logos) reactions to those assertions. Additionally, explain whether or not this text has persuaded you to consider saving for your future and purchasing life insurance.

2. Charting* (will be scored after all readings have been completed)

Make a fourth entry on your chart for “A Human Life Value Calculator” Feel free to use the analysis, summary, connections, and critical thinking work you did as a way to fill out the chart.

Text 5: “What Is The Value Of A Human Life”

Background

This text is written by Kenneth Feinberg, the same man placed in charge of disbursements of money to the families of 9/11 victims. Here he writes about his past practice of valuing a human’s life and about his change of perspective resulting from another tragedy. Compare and contrast your perspective of Feinberg as he presents himself in this text with your perspective of him after reading Amanda Ripley’s Time magazine article.

Genre

This text is a reflective essay published in NPR’s Opinion section in the special series “This I Believe.” The essay allows the author to elaborate on his thoughts and perspective on a topic. Published in both print and audio formats, the text reached a wide audience. Consider how the author, through the varying means of production, is able to achieve the purpose and desired impact of his reflection.

1. Analyzing and Summarizing

  1. Why does Feinberg emphasize that awarding compensation based on the financial circumstances of victims “happens every day in courtrooms” and that our system of justice “has always been based upon this idea”?
  2. Why does Feinberg say his response to the widow of a firefighter who died at the World Trade Center was “defensive and unconvincing”?
  3. What does Feinberg mean when he says, “Feinberg the citizen should trump Feinberg the lawyer”?
  4. What is the significance of the phrases “no longer” and “this time” in the sentence where Feinberg explains that all victims of the Virginia Tech shootings would be treated the same way?

2. Charting* (will be scored after all readings have been completed)

Make a fifth entry on your chart for “What Is The Value Of A Human Life.” Feel free to use the analysis, summary, connections, and critical thinking work you did as a way to fill out the chart. 

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