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I Want To Do 1 Summary 1 Discussion And 1 Response For English 101 1

YOU ARE HALF WAY THROUGH THIS COURSE.

I’M SENDING YOU A HIGH FIVE AND GOOD ENERGY AS YOU STEP CLOSER TO COMPLETING THIS COURSE.

LET’S CONTINUE OUR JOURNEY TOGETHER. FOR THIS MODULE, WE’LL BEGIN BY READING MICHAEL OMI’S SEMINAL ARTICLE, “IN LIVING COLOR,” FROM OUR TEXTBOOK, SIGNS OF LIFE IN THE USA.

WHAT TO DO:

Read Michael Omi’s “In Living Color: Race and American Culture” Preview the document. download

This article is in your Signs of Life.

After you read this article, you will write a summary + a thesis

7 hours ago

YOU’RE A SYNTHESIS PRO NOW, SO PLEASE USE THESE SKILLS AND WRITE A SUMMARY AND THESIS FOR OMI’S ARTICLE, “IN LIVING COLOR.”

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. For this assignment, you will be submitting your summary in MLA format. download
  2. Include a thesis statement
  3. Include in-text citations
  4. Include a Works Cited
  5. Check Formal Voice
  6. Check Grammar
  7. Click the red submit assignment button (at the top right-hand side of this page) and upload your file.

CANVAS GUIDE:

  • How do I submit an online assignment? (Links to an external site.)
  • If you are having any issues regarding canvas and it is during business hours, you can email onlinehelp@piercecollege.edu. If it is evenings or weekend, you can call Canvas support at 844-303-5589.

RUBRIC

This assignment will be graded using the rubric below, entitled, “Summary.” It is worth 10 points.

Rubric

Rubric: Summary with a Thesis Statement (2)

Rubric: Summary with a Thesis Statement (2)

CriteriaRatingsPts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeThe Summary’s First Sentence:

2 pts

Mastery

In the summary is well written and complete; in the first sentence, the student correctly provides the following information: a) the title of the article; b) the full name of the writer; c) the article’s main idea. The student also provided relevant examples that supports the writer’s main ideas.

1 pts

Partial Credit

In the summary’s first sentence, the student is missing, does not properly cite, or gives misleading information about ONE of the following areas: a) the title of the article b) the full name of the writer c) the main idea of the article OR an example may not support the writer’s main idea.

0 pts

Skill not Demonstrated

The summary may be incomplete, hard to understand due to multiple grammatical oversights, or have more than three content oversights. Please see commentary.

2 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeThesis Statement

2 pts

Mastery

The student has an explicit thesis at the end of the summary and briefly states at least one reason for this opinion.

1 pts

Progress is Evident

The student agrees or disagrees with the writer, but the student does not give at least one reason for this opinion.

0 pts

Skill not Demonstrated

The student does not have a thesis that can be proven, the thesis indicates the student does not understand the article, or the thesis is absent.

2 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeMLA FORMAT

1 pts

Full Marks

Student set up his/her/their essay according to MLA guidelines

0 pts

No Marks

Student had one or more oversight in MLA formatting. Please review MLA format page.

1 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeIn-text Citations

1 pts

Full Marks

Student properly formats in-text citations.

0 pts

No Marks

Student does not properly format in-text citations OR they are missing from the summary.

1 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeWorks Cited

2 pts

Full Marks

Student properly formatted the Works Cited page. No oversights were apparent.

1 pts

Partial Credit

Student had one oversight in the Works Cited formatting. Please check page, “Works Cited” and review skill.

0 pts

No Marks

Student had two or more oversights in his/her/their Works Cited. Please review our Works Cited page.

2 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeFormal Voice

2 pts

Full Marks

No formal voice oversights

0 pts

No Marks

1 or more formal voice oversights

2 pts

Total Points: 10

Second part:

Analysis of Walnut Ad

LET’S READ THE SIGNS

You have just read Omi’s article about racial representation and how it continues to send subtle, hidden, but still prevalent social codes about race and gender. Let’s test Omi’s thesis from “In Living Color.”

By the end of this unit, you’ll be examining advertisements and analyzing their semiotic codes about race.

As a model for this analysis, let’s analyze the California Walnut Advertisement below.

INSTRUCTIONS:

  • Closely examine the advertisement. This advertisement can be found in your Signs of Life text in the “Portfolio of Advertisements.”
  • Fill out the observation list (below ad) to help you see the small details
  • Then answer the questions on the following page.

ADVERTISEMENT:

California Walnut Ad is in your textbook, Signs of Life.  It depicts a white male, white female, and an African American female jumping from a burning walnut

OBSERVATION LIST:

Print out a copy of this list. You may use pen or pencil to manually fill out it out. This list will help you with the upcoming questions.

print : California Walnut Observation List.

Actions

COMPARE THE MODELS IN THE WALNUT ADVERTISEMENT:

detailManWoman, CenterWoman, Rightclothesactivitywhat they are carrying and what is happening to the items they are carryingshoesposition in adwho is running with or against traffictraffic in the backgroundlocation of walnuts around modelsOther details you notice:

WALNUT AD: QUESTIONS

I believe that you can always learn from observation–Tamara Tunie

AFTER YOU COMPLETE YOUR OBSERVATION LIST, USE THIS LIST TO ANSWER THE QUESTIONS BELOW.

Look at how the male and females are represented in the Caifornia Walnut advertisement. (Note: Advertisement is available in the portfolio section of your textbook, Signs of Life in the USA).

Select three of the following inquiries to answer. Each answer should be complete, and should be at least five sentences or more.

INQUIRY 1:

Examine the three model’s clothes and shoes: What are the lifestyles of each person? Where are they going in these outfits? Who would get the furthest in their choice of shoes? What is the implication about gender? What is the message about race?

INQUIRY 2:

Who is the most relaxed in this scene? Why? What is the message about gender and race?

INQUIRY 3:

Direction of traffic: who is running against traffic? Who is running with the flow of traffic? What is the implied meaning about gender and race?

INQUIRY 4:

Look closely at the location of the walnuts. Who is grabbing or taking the nuts? What is the implied message about gender and race?

INQUIRY 5:

What are the people carrying? What is happening to the items that they carry? What is the implied message about gender and race?

INQUIRY 6:

Do you notice any significant details that you think have gendered OR racial implications? Please explain.

INQUIRY 7:

In your opinion, what is the overall semiotic code about race or gender? Why do you think this? If you were re-creating this advertisement, what would you do to switch the codes?

8.2 / DISCUSSION: Walnut Ad – Home Group 5

From ENGLISH_101_16671SP21P

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I’m looking forward to hearing your insights!

After closely analyzing the California Walnut advertisement and thinking about the following questions (from the previous pages), you will select 3 INQUIRIES to answer and then share your answers here.

ANSWER ANY THREE INQUIRIES:

  1. Inquiry 1: Clothes and shoes: What are the lifestyles of each person? Where are they going in these outfits? Who would get the furthest in their choice of shoe wear? What is the implication about gender? What is the message about race?
  2. Inquiry 2: Who is the most relaxed in this scene? Why? What is the message about gender and race?
  3. Inquiry 3: Direction of traffic: who is running against traffic? Who is running with the flow of traffic? What is the implied meaning about gender and race?
  4. Inquiry 4: Look closely at the location of the walnuts. Who is grabbing or taking the nuts? What is the implied message about gender and race?
  5. Inquiry 5: What are the people carrying? What is happening to the items that they carry? What is the implied message about gender and race?
  6. Inquiry 6: Do you notice any significant details that you think have gendered OR racial implications? Please explain.
  7. Inquiry 7: In your opinion, what is the overall semiotic code about race or gender? Why do you think this? If you were re-creating this advertisement, what would you do to switch the codes?

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Respond to THREE of the above inquiries. Each inquiry response should be at least 5 sentences or more to receive credit. Paste these responses in the reply box below.
  2. Reply to two classmates’ responses. In at least three sentences or more, let the classmate know what you found interesting or insightful about the interpretation. If you have any way to “read” the signs that the writer did not mention, include this interpretation in your response.

IMPORTANT NOTICE:

This assignment is not eligible for the 7 day grace pass. You should post your answers by March 29 and respond to your teammates due by APRIL 1st. Submissions beyond this date will not be given credit.

Reason: Discussions are not independent projects and depend on your timely interaction to be meaningful (since people are responding to one another’s posts)

And the last part:

EVIEW OF STUDENT DISCUSSION ABOUT WALNUT AD:

First, I wanted to compliment everyone for being able to analyze difficult topics about racial representations. We need to discuss these representations to see how society has constructed certain gender and race codes that are not evident at first glance. By being able to see things from multiple perspectives, we gain a deeper understanding.

In the upcoming pages, I wanted to review ways of reading the Walnut Advertisement based on our discussion posts.

THE PURPOSE FOR REVIEWING THESE IDEAS IS TO PREPARE YOU FOR OUR MIDTERM EXAM IN THE UPCOMING MODULE 9.

In short, for our midterm exam, you will be explaining how specific advertisements reflect implied semiotic codes. My upcoming review will further model the thinking and writing skills necessary to do well on our midterm.

Flipping the Code

I think if education was celebrated in pop culture, we’d live in a better place. – Cote de Pablo

TIP: CONTINUE TO TAKE NOTES ON THE FOLLOWING LESSON, AS THESE NOTES WILL HELP YOU ANSWER THE QUESTIONS IN THE UPCOMING PAGE.

While we have been learning how popular culture may reinforce misleading social codes, we have yet to talk about possible solutions or ways for us to recognize these codes outside of our class. In fact, since social codes are internalized, or become a subconscious part of our thinking process, we might not even SEE these implications unless we have people point them out (or we closely focus on re-reading the signs as we are doing in this class).

The upcoming lessons will provide possibilities for us to “re-see” the implications of social codes on our own.

Let’s check them out…

NEW WAYS OF SEEING

Erving Geoff, a leading theorist on semiotics, once said that we can make subconscious codes apparent, and even seem ridiculous or more evident, by switching the codes. He theorizes that the original images are often taken for granted and internalized as normal UNTIL we consciously flip the codes to see how peculiar and arbitrary they are.

Let’s look at some examples:

While the advertisement’s 1950 codes are more obvious to us because we’ve already flipped these assumptions, a 1950 observer might conversely see these images as realistic and even unquestionable due to their social context.

CODE SWITCHING is a powerful tool to use throughout your life, and this practice can be extended to topics other than racial and gender representation. Whenever you are unsure if there’s a code / value / assumption / way of thinking that you are unable to see, switch out the model, politician, or role model, and see if this might enlighten your perspective. Here are some ways you can use code switching:

RELATIONSHIPS: If you are in a relationship and have questions about whether it’s healthy, code switch. Pretend your best friend is in this very relationship. What advice would you tell him/her/them?

POLITICAL VIEWS: If you are making allowances or condemning a leader’s behavior or policies, code switch. If this were a leader you liked / disliked, would you hold this leader to the same standard?

In other words, code switching can give you a critical distance to evaluate your belief system, and this can be personally liberating.

But let’s return to our conversation about gender / race and code switching. The following two videos are optional, but they are informative. If you are unsure about the idea of code switching, you should definitely check them out. The first video often makes students laugh; the second video often makes students feel uncomfortable, upset, and surprised.

WATCH VIDEO: CODE SWITCHING FOR GENDER

WATCH VIDEO: CODE SWITCHING FOR RACE

There have also been experiments about racial code flipping; one of the most famous and controversial is from a retired school teacher, Jane Elliot. This is a powerful, and often disturbing, social experiment.

Let’s chat before we close this unit… click next to continueReading the Signs: That’s Nuts!

RECOMMENDATION:

Read page first, then look at video (below) to review ideas.

SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT:

WHAT I SEE / WHAT IT MEANS

Interestingly, students saw both women as people reaching for “nuts,” and they didn’t know if that was literally a nut or symbolically a phallic symbol (Links to an external site.). Some people shied away from this topic.

A few of your peers looked closely at the black woman and noticed that nuts were falling out of her purse; the nuts were placed nearly symmetrically beneath her rectangle clutch bag, again looking like a phallic symbol. They theorized that she was holding a phallic symbol, which ultimately sexualized her and had a negative connotation about her activities. Though she was nicely dressed, athletic, and jumping from the same walnut, the students concurred that she was simply not represented in equal terms to the other two models.

Meanwhile, the male model had two symmetrically placed walnuts on each side of his head. People believed that his position, his head between two nuts, positioned him as the ultimate phallic symbol in the advertisement. (I know– that description is a bit graphic, but it is relevant to the analysis!) Since a phallic symbol is supposed to represent power, the students believed that this model’s very body became the embodiment of empowerment and by implication, implied privilege.

ANALYSIS COMPLETE. LET’S COMPLETE THIS MODULE!Reading the Signs: That’s Nuts!

RECOMMENDATION:

Read page first, then look at video (below) to review ideas.

SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT:

WHAT I SEE / WHAT IT MEANS

Interestingly, students saw both women as people reaching for “nuts,” and they didn’t know if that was literally a nut or symbolically a phallic symbol (Links to an external site.). Some people shied away from this topic.

A few of your peers looked closely at the black woman and noticed that nuts were falling out of her purse; the nuts were placed nearly symmetrically beneath her rectangle clutch bag, again looking like a phallic symbol. They theorized that she was holding a phallic symbol, which ultimately sexualized her and had a negative connotation about her activities. Though she was nicely dressed, athletic, and jumping from the same walnut, the students concurred that she was simply not represented in equal terms to the other two models.

Meanwhile, the male model had two symmetrically placed walnuts on each side of his head. People believed that his position, his head between two nuts, positioned him as the ultimate phallic symbol in the advertisement. (I know– that description is a bit graphic, but it is relevant to the analysis!) Since a phallic symbol is supposed to represent power, the students believed that this model’s very body became the embodiment of empowerment and by implication, implied privilege.

ANALYSIS COMPLETE. LET’S COMPLETE THIS MODULE!Reading the Signs: Gender 

These videos are to help you prep for the final. You should watch them to get an idea of how to analyze the semiotic implications behind visual data.

Recommendation

Read page first, then check out video (below) to review ideas:

Students noticed the the man was dressed casually, running in the direction of traffic.

People read these signs as he had a life of leisure (because he had time to exercise); moreover, since he was going in the direction of traffic, he had no symbolic “obstacles” in his way or path. They read this as a way for him to move quickly to his destination without being blocked along the way (literally), and symbolically as a sign of his financial mobility to get where he wanted to go.

Also, two students noticed that his hands were free (while the women carried objects such as brief cases and purses). They interpreted this image as a sign that he literally had less baggage to carry, or as a metaphor for saying he had less problems. By contrast, the women were represented as having issues, as their brief case and purse were open and things were falling out. The semiotic code is that women are not as together as the male even though they are definitely dressed better than him; also, since he is an “unmarked” subject as Tannen once argued about male representation, he is not pressured to wear specific clothes that relay his authority, wealth, or power.

Likewise, his physical position, as the first figure in the group, already implies his authority. (Since our eye scans the page from left to right in a typical reading motion, we subconsciously recognize the person on the far left as the first person we see and therefore the most important figure).

MIDTERM TIP: THIS IS JUST AN OVERVIEW. FOR THE MIDTERM, YOU WOULD NEED TO VIVIDLY DESCRIBE THE MALE MODEL’S CLOTHING, THEN FURTHER EXPLAIN AND DEVELOP THE IMPLICATIONS OF HIS ECONOMIC STATUS.

Video Overview of Gender Representation in the Walnut Advertisement:

Reading Signs of Race

VIDEO LECTURE

Recommendation: Read page first, then return to the video below to see my lecture

RACE TO THE TOP:

WHAT I SEE / WHAT IT MEANS

People also had many interesting observations about how race was represented. Your peers noticed that the middle woman was dressed in a suit, while the other woman wore a green party dress with high heels. A few students noted that the African American female, the model, looked like she was ready to go out to party at night, and they saw this code in multiple ways: a) The implication is that this model is not as serious or she likes to party. b) She has time to party, so she may not be an executive. In both readings, students agreed that the white female model was framed as a worker during the day and serious about her job, while the black female model was framed as a party-goer at night and by implication, not as focused on work.

Students read these differences in clothes as a sign for mobility; the middle woman represented that she was trying to become part of a business culture while the other woman looked like she was going out– at night– to have fun. By reading these signs through a racial lens, students said that the white woman was symbolically represented to be joining the corporate world while the black woman was represented as having fun rather than working. Moreover, students noticed that the black woman was running against traffic in high heels, which would make it physically hard for her to run as far as her counterparts. They believed that this was a code for how she would face more obstacles that impede her mobility in comparison to the other models in the advertisement.

TIP: FOR THE MIDTERM, YOU WOULD NEED TO DESCRIBE THE MODELS’ CLOTHING IN MORE DETAIL, THEN EXPLAIN THE IMPLICATIONS.

Reading the Signs: That’s Nuts!

RECOMMENDATION:

Read page first, then look at video (below) to review ideas.

SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT:

WHAT I SEE / WHAT IT MEANS

Interestingly, students saw both women as people reaching for “nuts,” and they didn’t know if that was literally a nut or symbolically a phallic symbol (Links to an external site.). Some people shied away from this topic.

A few of your peers looked closely at the black woman and noticed that nuts were falling out of her purse; the nuts were placed nearly symmetrically beneath her rectangle clutch bag, again looking like a phallic symbol. They theorized that she was holding a phallic symbol, which ultimately sexualized her and had a negative connotation about her activities. Though she was nicely dressed, athletic, and jumping from the same walnut, the students concurred that she was simply not represented in equal terms to the other two models.

Meanwhile, the male model had two symmetrically placed walnuts on each side of his head. People believed that his position, his head between two nuts, positioned him as the ultimate phallic symbol in the advertisement. (I know– that description is a bit graphic, but it is relevant to the analysis!) Since a phallic symbol is supposed to represent power, the students believed that this model’s very body became the embodiment of empowerment and by implication, implied privilege.

ANALYSIS COMPLETE. LET’S COMPLETE THIS MODULE!

Written Lecture: Myth busting

A SIGN IS ANYTHING THAT CAN BE USED TO TELL A LIE.
-UMBERTO ECO, A THEORY OF SEMIOTICS

Umberto Eco’s observation is important; when we are able to read the signs, what pervasive codes– and misleading assumptions– do they tell us about our society?

BEFORE YOU BEGIN:

Please take notes on this lesson, “Myth busting.” You will turn in your notes and your reaction in the following pages.

THE BURNING QUESTION:

In the past, I have had some students ask me this question: Isn’t a semiotic code true since it is based on common assumptions of large groups of people?

This is an important question.

Before we exit this unit on racial representation, it is important for us to do some myth-busting and to see for ourselves if a semiotic code is valid or true.

SHORT ANSWER:

Many semiotic codes are problematic, but the continual perpetuation of these codes by many different media venues- films, commercials, advertisements, may lead people to falsely think these codes are actually true or reliable ways to make sense of our world.

These assumptions occur because the semiotic codes keep getting reproduced in society through media, and people mistakenly internalize these messages without realizing that these messages contradict factual data. For example, President Trump seemed surprised that his assumption about welfare recipients was incorrect. For the article, see Newsweek (Links to an external site.). While many people might denounce the President for his tweets, the truth is that his actions reflect the assumptions inherent in many media portrayals.

By identifying social codes, we have a deeper understanding of what we may accept as “truth.”

LET’S BEGIN OUR MYTH-BUSTING

In the following advertisement by United Colors of Benneton, there exists a semiotic code that symbolically links race to poverty:

Let’s analyze this advertisement to witness how the code emerges.

WHAT WE SEE: A HAND-AS-A-SPOON

In this ad, we see a person of color whose hand has been turned into a silver spoon. We are led to believe that his spoon is a prosthetic for his right hand; we are also lead to believe that this man needs a financial hand, so to speak; the advertisers add the logo to their world hunger charity, “Food for Life,” right above his right shoulder.

WHAT IT MEANS [OR WHAT THE HAND-AS-A-SPOON IMPLIES ABOUT RACE]:

The symbolic implication is that this person of color cannot feed himself and must rely on others’ financial aide– not just for a moment, but instead, as the charity logo suggests, “For life.” Significantly, rather than having a real hand, the model needs a helping hand from the audience; he is unable to work or fend for himself. The semiotic code suggests that people of color need financial help, and they are dependents on others’ or the system; in short, the implied message is that they need others to give them “food for [all their] life.”

Though this advertisement is to promote a WORLD food program, and this model could come anywhere from around the world (and not necessarily the USA), the advertisers have still created a connection in our minds between poverty and the color of ones’ skin. The bottom line is that the advertisement sends this implied semiotic message, or code, about race: A person of color needs assistance and must rely on welfare programs; this person has now been framed as an underhanded taker, and not as a giver, within this system.

MYTH-BUSTING THIS CODE:

By seeing repeated images or social codes of this nature, some people come to believe that people of color rely on welfare more than other groups in the US.

This semiotic code is false.

The Economists refers to this situation as a “damaging distortion” in their article, “Black Americans are Over Represented in Media-Portrayals of Poverty.” (Links to an external site.) This portrayal, or semiotic code, is false because current statistics explicitly show that the largest, most impoverished group is actually white, and this group is also the largest group who depends on welfare benefits to survive. As Robert Ross, a sociologists from Inequality.Org, notes in “Poverty More than a Matter of Black and White”: (Links to an external site.)

But the white poor outnumber the black poor considerably, 19 to 7.8 million. White people make up 42 percent of America’s poor, black people about 28 percent.

The basic numbers don’t change when we look at people living in extreme poverty, in households making less than 50 percent of the meager poverty line. Of the 20 million people who live at this alarming level of want and deprivation, about 42 percent are white, 27 percent black.

These data have political implications that racial stereotyping usually shroud from public view. Many white people who don’t live anywhere near poverty, even many who consider themselves liberal, think blacks compose most of the poor.

Here we discover that the semiotic code, as communicated in the Benneton advertisement and many other advertisements, is flawed. Rather than representing any form of truth, it actually reflects our assumptions about race and even our prejudices as a society.

By recognizing semiotic messages, we dare to think outside the box. This can be very hard, especially if this thinking leads us in a different direction than people around us OR challenges even our own understanding of the world.

But this is ultimately the process of growing as a learner and developing new ways of seeing.

Please review this lecture as many times as necessary and take notes. You will post these notes, along with your own reflection, in the upcoming pages.

Media Myths

BEFORE YOU SUBMIT YOUR NOTES ON THE LESSON, “MYTH BUSTING,” LET’S SEE ONE MORE WAY TO FLIP THE CODE. AS YOU READ THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE,

PLEASE TAKE NOTES. YOU WILL BE USING THEM SOON.

The Media’s Stereotypical Portrayals of Race

By Sam Fulwood III

Posted on March 5, 2013, 2:01 pm

Source: Center for American Progress (Links to an external site.)

The media's stereotypical portrayals of race have obscured reality in sports.

AP/Lynne Sladky: Miami Heat’s LeBron James speaks with Los Angeles Lakers’ Kobe Bryant during a game on January 19, 2012.

I’m no longer sure that seeing is believing. As a former newspaper journalist, I’m disheartened to say that what you now see in the media isn’t always an objective reality. Even when an article or broadcast reports the truth, the accompanying pictures and images can sometimes impress upon readers or viewers another set of facts that may be at odds with the story.

Harvard University professor Henry Louis “Skip” Gates, for example, delights in detailing how he used the gross distortion of media imagery of black men in sports to win a bar bet with the folks at the Veterans of Foreign Wars, or VFW, post in his hometown of Piedmont, West Virginia.In an essay written for Sports Illustrated, Gates, an authority on African American literature and culture, told his drinking buddies that there were approximately 35 million black people living in the United States. He then wagered $5 to anyone who could tell him how many African Americans make a living playing professional sports in the United States. The group of sports-loving men smiled, knowing they had a sucker in their midst. Everyone at the VFW post knew that blacks dominate some of the most popular sports in America. All they had to do was turn on their televisions, right?

Gates, a great raconteur, tells the story:“Ten million!” yelled one intrepid soul, too far into his cups.

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